Thursday, 26 May 2022

ICD-11 Criteria for Symptomatic and Course Presentations for Mood Episodes in Mood Disorders (6A80)

ICD-11 Criteria for Symptomatic and Course Presentations for Mood Episodes in Mood Disorders (6A80)

These categories may be applied to describe the presentation and characteristics of mood episodes in the context of single episode depressive disorder, recurrent depressive disorder, bipolar type I disorder, or bipolar type II disorder. These categories indicate the presence of specific, important features of the clinical presentation or of the course, onset, and pattern of mood episodes. These categories are not mutually exclusive, and as many may be added as apply.

Coding Note:     These categories should never be used in primary coding. The codes are provided for use as supplementary or additional codes when it is desired to identify specific clinically important features of mood episodes in mood disorders.

Coded Elsewhere:  Mental or behavioural disorders associated with pregnancy, childbirth or the puerperium, without psychotic symptoms (6E20)

Mental or behavioural disorders associated with pregnancy, childbirth or the puerperium, with psychotic symptoms (6E21)

6A80.0       Prominent anxiety symptoms in mood episodes

In the context of a current depressive, manic, mixed, or hypomanic episode, prominent and clinically significant anxiety symptoms (e.g., feeling nervous, anxious or on edge, not being able to control worrying thoughts, fear that something awful will happen, having trouble relaxing, motor tension, autonomic symptoms) have been present for most of the time during the episode. If there have been panic attacks during a current depressive or mixed episode, these should be recorded separately.

When the diagnostic requirements for both a mood disorder and an anxiety or fear-related disorder are met, the anxiety or fear-related disorder should also be diagnosed.

Coding Note:     Code aslo the causing condition

6A80.1       Panic attacks in mood episodes

In the context of a current mood episode (manic, depressive, mixed, or hypomanic), there have been recurrent panic attacks (i.e., at least two) during the past month that occur specifically in response to anxiety-provoking cognitions that are features of the mood episode. If panic attacks occur exclusively in response to such thoughts, panic attacks should be recorded using this qualifier rather than assigning an additional co-occurring diagnosis of panic disorder.

If some panic attacks over the course of the depressive or mixed episode have been unexpected and not exclusively in response to depressive or anxiety-provoking thoughts, a separate diagnosis of panic disorder should be assigned.

Coding Note:     Code aslo the causing condition

Exclusions:             

Panic disorder (6B01)

6A80.2       Current depressive episode persistent

The diagnostic requirements for a depressive episode are currently met and have been met continuously for at least the past 2 years.

6A80.3      Current depressive episode with melancholia

In the context of a current Depressive Episode, several of the following symptoms have been present during the worst period of the current episode: loss of interest or pleasure in most activities that are normally enjoyable to the individual (i.e., pervasive anhedonia); lack of emotional reactivity to normally pleasurable stimuli or circumstances (i.e., mood does not lift even transiently with exposure); terminal insomnia (i.e., waking in the morning two hours or more before the usual time); depressive symptoms are worse in the morning; marked psychomotor retardation or agitation; marked loss of appetite or loss of weight.

6A80.4      Seasonal pattern of mood episode onset

In the context of recurrent depressive disorder, bipolar type I or bipolar type II disorder, there has been a regular seasonal pattern of onset and remission of at least one type of episode (i.e., depressive, manic, mixed, or hypomanic episodes), with a substantial majority of the relevant mood episodes corresponding to the seasonal pattern. (In bipolar type I and bipolar type II disorder, all types of mood episodes may not follow this pattern.) A seasonal pattern should be differentiated from an episode that is coincidental with a particular season but predominantly related to a psychological stressor that regularly occurs at that time of the year (e.g., seasonal unemployment).

6A80.5       Rapid cycling

In the context of bipolar type I or bipolar type II disorder, there has been a high frequency of mood episodes (at least four) over the past 12 months. There may be a switch from one polarity of mood to the other, or the mood episodes may be demarcated by a period of remission. In individuals with a high frequency of mood episodes, some may have a shorter duration than those usually observed in bipolar type I or bipolar type II disorder. In particular, depressive periods may only last several days. If depressive and manic symptoms alternate very rapidly (i.e., from day to day or within the same day), a mixed episode should be diagnosed rather than rapid cycling.

Coding Note:     Code aslo the causing condition

  6A8Y                   Other specified mood disorders

  6A8Z                   Mood disorders, unspecified

REFERENCE:

International Classification of Diseases Eleventh Revision (ICD-11). Geneva: World Health Organization; 2022. License: CC BY-ND 3.0 IGO.

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo/


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