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The Inventory of Depressive Symptoms and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms (IDS and QIDS)

The Inventory of Depressive Symptoms and the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms (IDS and QIDS)   Rush et al., 1986; Rush, Gullion, Basco, Jarrett, & Trivedi, 1996; Rush et al., 2003). T he IDS/QIDS can be used as a screening tool; the QIDS is also appropriate to use as a diagnostic tool and to monitor symptom change over time (IDS-QIDS.org, 2013). The IDS/QIDS has not been used with adolescents, nor does a separate adolescent version exist. The IDS (30-item) and QIDS (16-item) are self- and clinician-report measures assessing depressive symptoms in adults. The briefer QIDS queries for only the nine major depressive disorder domains outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4 th ed, Text Revision (DSM-IVTR, American Psychiatric Association, 2010), where the IDS queries for these domains as well as associated symptoms such as anxiety and irritability. Each item is rated from zero (“does not feel sad”) to three (“feels intensely sad virtually all the t

Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D)

Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) Hamilton, 1960. The HAM-D is a 17-item clinician-report measure assessing depressive symptoms in adults. The HAM-D can be used as a screening tool (Hamilton, 1960). There is disagreement in the literature regarding the HAM-D’s sensitivity to change and thus its appropriateness as a treatment monitoring tool. The HAM-D has been used in several studies with adolescents (e.g. Keller et al., 2001), but a separate adolescent version does not exist. Sample items include, “Depr e ssed mood” and “Feelings of guilt.” Eight symptoms are scored by severity on a zero to four scale, and eight symptoms are scored by intensity on a zero to two scale. The HAM-D is designed to be administered in 12 minutes and a structured interview guide can assist in scoring. The HAM-D demonstrates good internal consistency (α = .83), and adequate test-retest reliability over a period of four days ( r = .81). It demonstrates good to excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC

The Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale

The Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS) (Zimmerman, Chelminski, McGlinchey, & Posternak, 2008) The CUDOS can be used as a screening tool, a diagnostic tool (Zimmerman et al., 2008), and to monitor symptom changes over time (Zimmerman, McGlinchey, & Chelminski, 2008). The CUDOS has not been used with adolescents, nor does a separate adolescent version exist. The CUDOS is an 18-item self-report measure assessing depressive symptoms in adults. Sample items include, “I felt sad or depressed,”  “I was not as interested in my usual activities,” and “I felt guilty.” Each item is rated on a 5-point Likert scale indicating from zero (“not at all true/0 days”) to four (“almost always true/every day”). Total scores range from 0 to 64. The CUDOS was designed to be completed in less than three minutes and scored in less than 15 seconds. The CUDOS demonstrates excellent internal consistency (α = .90) and adequate test-retest reliability over a period of one week ( r > .92;

Neuropsychiatric lupus: a mosaic of clinical presentations

Neuropsychiatric lupus: a mosaic of clinical presentations Shaye Kivity 1,2,5† , Nancy Agmon-Levin 1,5† , Gisele Zandman-Goddard 3,5 , Joab Chapman 4,5  and Yehuda Shoenfeld 1,5,6,7* Abstract Neuropsychiatric symptoms affect nearly half of the patients with systemic lupus erythematosus; however, the effect on disease severity, quality of life, and the prognosis is tremendous. Symptoms of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus may range from mild diffuse ones to acute life-threatening events. Although the underlying mechanisms are still largely unravelled, several pathogenic pathways are identified, such as antibody-mediated neurotoxicity, vasculopathy due to anti-phospholipid antibodies and other mechanisms, and cytokine-induced neurotoxicity. The current review describes the old and the new regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. The possible link between neuropsychiatric symptoms and specific mechanis