Showing posts with label Disruptive Behavior Disorders. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Disruptive Behavior Disorders. Show all posts

Sunday, 15 May 2022

Child Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT)

Child Eating Attitudes Test (ChEAT)

(Maloney, McGuire, & Daniels, 1988).

The ChEAT is a 26-item self-report measure assessing disordered eating in youths ages 8-13. We can use the ChEAT as a screening tool (Garner, 2010). We developed it from the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26; Garner, Olmsted, Bohr, & Garfinkel, 1982) for adults. The ChEAT comprises three subscales: dieting, restricting, and food preoccupation. Sample items include, “I think a lot about having fat on my body,” and “I like my stomach to be empty.” Each item is rated using a 4-point Likert scale as either zero (“Sometimes,” “Rarely,” and “Never”), one (“Often”), two (“Very Often”), or three (“Always”). We can administer it in five minutes. It shows acceptable to good internal consistency (α = .76-.87; Verhulst & van der Ende, 2006). In addition, the ChEAT demonstrates concurrent.

The validity with independent measures of weight management and body dissatisfaction (Smolak & Levine, 1994). This measure is available online (http://www.1000livesplus.wales.nhs.uk/sitesplus/documents/1011/ChEAT.pdf).

Disruptive Behavior Disorders

Disruptive Behavior Disorders

Child and Adolescent Disruptive Behavior Inventory-Parent & Teacher Version (CADBI)

(Burns, Taylor, & Rusby, 2001a; 2001b).

The CADBI is a 25-item parent- or teacher-report measure assessing disruptive behaviors in youths (age range not specified). Although no appropriate age range the authors have set guidelines, the CADBI has been used in validation studies with youth ages 3 to 18 (e.g., Burns, Boe, Walsh, Sommers-Flanagan, & Teegarden, 2001). The CADBI can be used as a screening and diagnostic tool (Taylor, Burns, Rusby, & Foster, 2006). The CADBI consists of two subscales assessing oppositional behavior towards peers and adults, and hyperactivity/impulsivity (Burns et al., 2001a; 2001b). Sample items include: “Annoys peers on purpose,” “Loses temper or gets angry with adults when doesn’t get own way” and “Sasses adults.” Each item is rated on an 8-point Likert scale from one (“Never in the past month”) to eight (“10 or more times per day”). This measure can be administered in approximately five minutes. The CADBI demonstrates excellent internal consistency (α = .91-.97), fair inter-rater reliability (r = .64-.69), and good test-retest reliability at 3-month interval; (r = .86-.94). It also demonstrates predictive validity with diagnoses of ADHD made by direct observations (http://measures.earlyadolescence.org/measures/view/40/).

This measure is available online (http://measures.earlyadolescence.org/measures/view/40).

Eating Disorders

Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26)

Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26)

(Garner et al., 1982).

The EAT-26 is a 26-item self- and clinician-report measure for youths ages 16-18 to assess for behaviors correlated with eating disorders. The EAT-26 can be used as a screening tool (Garner, 2010). The EAT-26 consists of three subscales: Dieting, Bulimia and Food Occupation, and Oral Control. Sample items include, “I feel that others would prefer if I ate more,” “I like my stomach to be empty,” and “I am occupied with a desire to be thinner.” The measure is rated using a 4-point Likert scale from zero (“Sometimes,” “Rarely,” and “Never”), one (“Often”), two (“Very often”), to three (“Always”). In addition to the original subscales, behavioral questions have been added to assess self-reported binge eating, self-induced vomiting, use of laxatives, extreme exercise, and past treatment of an eating disorder (Garner, 2010). The EAT-26 can be administered in ten minutes. Clinically disordered eating is indicated with a cut-off score of 20 out of a score of 78. The EAT-26 demonstrates excellent internal consistency, especially for patients with anorexia (AN; α = .90; Garner et al., 1982). It also demonstrates good discriminant validity and can distinguish between youths with AN, bulimia nervosa (BN), and/or binge-eating disorder (BED) from control youths. It can also discriminate youths with AN/BN from those with BED. However, it cannot distinguish those with AN from those with BN (Williamson, Prather, McKenzie, & Blouin, 1990). Strong psychometrics have also been found for different cultural groups (e.g., Spanish-speaking, Italian-speaking, etc.). The measure is available online (http://www.eat-26.com).

Thursday, 12 May 2022

Disruptive Behavior Disorders

Disruptive Behavior Disorders

Child and Adolescent Disruptive Behavior Inventory-Parent & Teacher Version (CADBI)

Burns, Taylor, & Rusby, 2001a; 2001b).

The CADBI is a 25-item parent- or teacher-report measure assessing disruptive behaviors in youths (age range not specified). Although no appropriate age range guidelines have been set by the authors, the CADBI has been used in validation studies with youth ages 3 to 18 (e.g., Burns, Boe, Walsh, Sommers-Flanagan, & Teegarden, 2001). The CADBI can be used as a screening and diagnostic tool (Taylor, Burns, Rusby, & Foster, 2006). The CADBI consists of two subscales assessing oppositional behavior towards peers and adults, and hyperactivity/impulsivity (Burns et al., 2001a; 2001b). Sample items include: “Annoys peers on purpose,” “Loses temper or gets angry with adults when doesn’t get own way” and “Sasse's adults.” Each item is rated on an 8-point Likert scale from one (“Never in the past month”) to eight (“10 or more times per day”). This measure can be administered in approximately five minutes. The CADBI demonstrates excellent internal consistency (α = .91-.97), fair inter-rater reliability (r = .64-.69), and good test-retest reliability at 3-month interval; (r = .86-.94). It also demonstrates predictive validity with diagnoses of ADHD made by direct observations (http://measures.earlyadolescence.org/measures/view/40/).

This measure is available online (http://measures.earlyadolescence.org/measures/view/40).

Eating Disorders

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