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Showing posts with the label ICD-10

Conversion Disorder

A 16-year-old girl presents with multiple unconsciousness. These started about six months ago and have become progressively worse. During the episodes, there is the jerky movement of the body but no urinary or faecal incontinence. These symptoms last for a few minutes and are followed by drowsiness. Neurological examination is normal. What differential diagnoses would you consider in this case? What other information would you enquire from the family about the episodes? Which specific investigations would you like to order? Differential Diagnosis Conversion disorder (F44.5 Dissociative convulsions) suggested by the episodes of unconsciousness and lack of findings on neurological examination and absence of incontinence. Epilepsy suggested by the recurrent brief episodes of unconsciousness, accompanied by jerky movements and followed by drowsiness Vasovagal syncope suggested by the brief episodes of unconsciousness, jerky movements (may occur) and normal physical examination Paroxysmal a

ICD 10 Multiaxial System

In multi-axial diagnosis, a patient’s problems are viewed within a broader context, which includes clinical diagnosis, assessment of disability, and psychosocial factors. In ICD-10, multi-axial diagnoses are made along three axes, as follows: Axis I: clinical diagnoses This includes all disorders, both psychiatric and physical, including learning disability and personality disorders.  Axis II: disabilities Conceptualized in line with WHO definitions of impairments, disabilities, and handicaps, this covers a number of specific areas of functioning that are rated on a scale of 0–5 (‘no disability’ to ‘gross disability’): Personal care: personal hygiene, dressing, feeding, etc. Occupation: expected functioning in paid activities, studying, homemaking, etc. Family and household: participation in family life. Functioning in a broader social context: participation in the wider community, including contact with friends, leisure, and other social activities.  Axis III: contextual factors The

Classification of Depression According to the ICD-10

A first depressive episode, duration at least15 days →depressive episode (F32)  A first depressive episode, severe and rapid onset, duration less than 15 days →still depressive episode (F32) A depressive episode can be mild (2 core symptoms, 2 other symptoms from the list) (32.0) moderate (2 core symptoms, 3 or preferably 4 other symptoms) (32.1) Severe (3 core symptoms, 4 other symptoms) without psychotic symptoms (32.2) (no delusion, hallucination or stupor) Severe with psychotic symptoms (above plus either delusions, hallucinations or stupor) (F32.3) Delusions can be mood-congruent or incongruent (neutral delusions e.g. delusions of reference are considered mood incongruent. None of them count towards schizoaffective disorder unless one of the first-rank)  A mild and moderate depressive episode can be  with somatic syndrome (four or more somatic symptoms, or three very severe somatic symptoms) without somatic syndrome (three or less somatic symptoms, not severe)  A severe depressi